A list of important terms we use to talk about diversity and inclusion.

Ableism. The individual, cultural and institutional beliefs and discrimination that systematically oppress people who have mental, emotional and physical disabilities.

Bisexual. A person who is sexually attracted to both men and women.

Capitalism. An economic and political system in which a country's trade and industry are controlled by private owners for profit, rather than by the state.

Classism. The institutional, cultural and individual set of beliefs and discrimination that assigns differential value to people according to their socio-economic status.

Diversity. A range of psychological, physical and social differences, including but not limited to race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, social class, physical ability or attributes, religious or ethical values system, national origin and political beliefs.

Equity. The guarantee of fair treatment, access, opportunity and advancement while at the same time striving to identify and eliminate barriers that have prevented the full participation of some groups.

Gay. People of the same sex who are attracted sexually and emotionally to one another. More commonly used to describe male attraction to other males.

Gender. The socially constructed ideas about behavior, actions and roles a particular sex performs. 

Inclusion. The act of creating environments in which any individual or group can be and feel welcomed, respected, supported, and valued to participate fully.

Lesbian. A woman whose primary sexual attraction is to other women.

Patriarchy. A system of society or government in which men hold the power and women are largely excluded from it.

Social Justice. The view that everyone deserves equal economic, political and social rights and opportunities.

Sex. A system of classification based on biological and physical differences, such as primary and secondary sexual characteristics.

Sexuality. A person's sexual orientation or preference.

Straight. A person who is attracted to people of the opposite sex.

White Supremacy. The belief that white people are superior to those of other races, especially the black race, and should therefore dominate society.

Xenophobia. Fear, hatred or mistrust of that which is foreign, especially strangers or people from different countries or cultures.